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The 100 most important people in the world of Xbox

To mark our 100th issue, we run through the people who will shape the next generation

Who are the most important people in the world of Xbox today? Five years ago it was the big execs who held all the power, but all that's starting to change. On one hand, we've seen the huge growth of a few games around which the industry revolves. The people who make them are, in gaming terms, superstars.

On the other, less-sung developers have far more opportunity to make games on their own terms than ever before, thanks to an explosion of new business models and the ubiquity of digital platforms. To celebrate our 100th issue, we've run down the hundred most important people shaping the industry and the games we play today. Some steer vast corporations, some have almost single-handedly created their own games, but they're all people to watch closely as we sail into the uncharted waters of the next generation. And the next 100 issues, of course.

100. Eric Chahi, game designer
One of game design's great dreamers, Eric Chahi is the creator of the technically groundbreaking Another World, originally released on the Amiga in 1991, and the virtually groundbreaking 2011 Xbox Live Arcade game From Dust. His care and imagination are unique.

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99. Tameem Antoniades, co-founder, Ninja Theory
It takes balls to face what Tameem Antoniades has faced in revealing and releasing the reboot DmC: Devil May Cry, but his self-confidence is backed by the talent that can tell a good story through an action game.

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98. Tanya Jessen, producer, Epic Games
From Bulletstorm to the upcoming Fortnite, Jessen has worked on Epic's most surprising, and fun, games of recent years. With many of her studio's key staff having recently left, expect to see a lot more of her.

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97. Chris Avellone, designer, Obsidian Entertainment
For a while he looked lost in gaming's hinterlands with big, text-heavy RPGs like Planescape: Torment that publishers didn't think people wanted to play. Since then, he's been recruited to a $4m-raising Kickstarter project, which just goes to show what those publishers know.

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96. Hilmar Veigar Pétursson, CEO, CCP
It's not for everyone, and certainly isn't for consoles, but EVE Online, the massively multiplayer sci-fi game that Pétursson's company has run for the last ten years is still hugely inspiring, chiefly for its freedom and player-led dynamism.

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95. Jo Twist, CEO, UKIE
UKIE is the UK counterpart of US videogame trade body the Entertainment Software Association (ESA). It campaigns for and offers real support to devs, especially small ones. Approachable, enthusiastic and knowledgeable, Jo Twist is its fine leader.

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94. Michael D. Gallagher, president and CEO, Entertainment Software Association
The ESA is the organiser of E3, which still holds the crown as the public event of the industry, while also encouraging US government in supporting videogames as a vital part of its economy.

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93. Jonathan Blow, game designer
With The Witness on the way and XBLA title Braid under his belt, Jonathan Blow deserves the respect he gets from across the industry as a design theorist and fearless critic of the shady practices he feels undermine our relationships with games.

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92. Tetsuya Mizuguchi, CEO, Q Entertainment
Rez, Sega Rally, Lumines, Space Channel 5. That's a pretty good resume. We don't know what this statesman of the Japanese industry is working on next, but his love of mixing games and other popular culture is sure to make it special.

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91. Phil Fish, founder, Polytron corporation
Don't listen to all the rubbish you hear about Polytron's Phil Fish. This talented designer might have a big mouth, but it's a result of his real love for videogames, and his delight at getting to make really good ones, like 2012's XBLA release Fez.

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