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Preorder Bioshock Infinite, get a Bioshock prequel ebook

Ken Levine and Joe Fielder collaborate on history of Columbia

This is the first time in my life somebody's released a preorder incentive that actually incentivises me to preorder. Snap up Bioshock Infinite ahead of release day (26th March), and you'll get a free copy of the ebook Mind in Revolt, a short story which sheds a little more light on the game's airborne, wartorn setting.

The ebook is the work of Bioshock Infinite writer Joe Fielder, with assistance from creative director Ken Levine. You can also buy it separately for $2.99 (UK pricing is TBC) from 12th February.

"Since we first announced BioShock Infinite, our fans have asked for more information about Columbia and the complex cast of characters that inhabit the floating city," Fielder comments over on Irrational's blog.

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"After reading the e-book, players will have a better understanding of BioShock Infinite's world, the struggle between its factions, and the motivations of key characters, like rebel leader Daisy Fitzroy, without spoiling the mysteries of BioShock Infinite."

As you'll know if you've watched the game's first few minutes, below, Columbia is an extraordinary feat - a chunk of hyper-political early 20th century Americana cut adrift and left for the winds to pick at. The opportunity to dig a little deeper beneath its skin is an opportunity worth seizing.

If you're more interested in the gunplay, however, you might find the Industrial Revolution Pack more compelling - also free to preordering players, it grants exclusive (for the moment, anyway) access to three combat boosting items, a fat wodge of in-game cash, five lock picks, and the Industrial Revolution puzzle game "which unlocks stories of Columbia and allows players to pledge their allegiance to the Vox Populi or Founders through Facebook."

According to level designer Shawn Elliott, "the sky's the limit" for future Bioshock games after Infinite. Slightly poor choice of words, perhaps. Read more about it in our three-hour hands-on.

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